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Metatarsal Stress Fracture (Foot fatigue fracture)

A metatarsal stress fracture occurs when the foot is overstrained. A rapid increase in hill or speed training, causing strain to the front of the foot, can create a stress fracture. Metatarsal stress fracture pain is precise, localized on the top of the foot, often in line with the third or fourth toe, and is very debilitating.

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Metatarsalgia (Pain in the forefoot)

Metatarsalgia causes pain under the foot, on the fat pad, just under the toes. Repeated or unusual pressure irritates this area. Pain is felt during the walking gait cycle, mainly when pressure is placed on the forefoot.

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Plantar Fasciopathy (Fasciitis, fasciosis, heel spurs)

Plantar fasciopathy, commonly known as fasciitis, is an irritation of the fascia under the foot. The plantar fascia extends like a rope between the calcaneus (heel bone) and toes, and helps support the foot’sarch. Pain often occurs gradually and may include foot stiffness in the morning. Pain may also increase with forefoot running.

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Hallux valgus (Big toe bunion)

Hallux valgus is a big toe deformity (hallux), causing it to deviate toward the second toe; i.e., outward (valgus). Former trauma to the big toe joint, genetics—for which not much can be done—or a restrictive environment such as a tight shoe, usually cause this deformity. Shoes that are non-compliant with the foot’s shape, shoes that are too short, too narrow or confine the big toe in an undesirable position increase probability of this valgus deformity.

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Interdigital Perineural Fibroma (Morton's neuroma)

Interdigital perineural fibroma, commonly called Morton's neuroma, refers to nerve inflammation and thickening caused by irritation because of nerve compression between adjacent bones and ligaments. The affected interdigital nerve is usually between the metatarsal bones in the third and fourth toes. This condition is characterized by acute and occasionally burning pain in the forefoot, sometimes associated with numbness or tingling.

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Fat Pad Syndrome (Heel pain)

The fat pad is composed of fat cells surrounded by small fibrous cells. This anatomical structure protects the heel bone, the calcaneus, from impact with the ground. This "absorbent" pad can become irritated, brittle and even thin if subjected to greater than usual stress.

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